Setting Priorities for Zinc-Related Health Research to Reduce Children's Disease Burden Worldwide: An Application of the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative's Research Priority-Setting Method

Brown et al. (2009) full text summary PDF

For which topic were research priorities identified?

zinc-related health research

In which location was the research priority setting conducted?

international

Why was it conducted at all?

To make the best use of limited resources for supporting health-related research to reduce child mortality, it is necessary to apply a suitable method to rank competing research options. Although Zn deficiency is not generally recognized as a direct cause of child mortality, recent research indicates that it predisposes children to an increased incidence and severity of several of the major direct causes of morbidity and mortality

What was the objective?

to rank possible research priorities concerning the control of Zn deficiency

What was the outcome?

a ranking list of 5 research topics

How long did the research prioritization take?

No information provided.

Which methods were used to identify research priorities?

CHNRI approach

How were the priorities for research identified exactly?

Step 1: experts identified and invited to participate, experts formed technical working group (TWG). Step 2: collecting research topics: TWG members were asked to list research options they believed to be important for reducing global Zn deficiency, with a particular focus on lower-income countries and restricting their priorities to those that would be expected to yield some impact on reducing disease burdens within 10 years, the target population was defined as children less than 5 years of age, and the target disease burden as all cases of mortality and morbidity related to Zn deficiency, 90 research options submitted. Step 3: data processing: compiling a summary list by combining similar and redundant options, organizing the consolidated list by type of intervention strategy, resulting in consolidated list of 31 research options. Step 4: scoring: TWG members asked to score each of the research options

Which stakeholders took part?

Community nutrition, dietetics, clinical nutrition and paediatrics, maternal nutrition, infectious diseases, public health nutrition programs, health economics, global nutrition policy and the food industry. 7 participants

How were stakeholders recruited?

A group of seven leading experts in the field of Zn research in child health were identified and invited to participate in this priority-setting exercise. The individuals were chosen to represent a wide range of expertise in Zn nutrition: community nutrition, dietetics, clinical nutrition and paediatrics, maternal nutrition, infectious diseases, public health nutrition programs, health economics, global nutrition policy and the food industry. These individuals have longstanding experience in their respective field of research and all have worked extensively in lower-income countries in Africa, Asia and/or Latin America. All seven invited experts agreed to participate.

Were stakeholders actively involved or did they just participate?

Stakeholders were mere participants of the research prioritization process; they were not actively involved in the process.