Identifying Research Questions for the Conservation of the Cape Floristic Region

Allsopp et al. (2019) full text summary PDF

For which topic were research priorities identified?

conservation of the Cape Floristic Region

In which location was the research priority setting conducted?

Africa - South Africa

Why was it conducted at all?

Environmental pressures with global or local impact are threatening systems such as the Cape Floristic Region (CFR), a globally unique biodiversity hotspot and conservation priority. Effective conservation of natural systems and countering of anthropogenic drivers of change that threaten the environment, biodiversity and ecosystem services requires guidance from well-grounded research. Conservation research, in turn, needs to be prioritised by stakeholders more broadly than the research community alone.

What was the objective?

to identify research questions that stakeholders felt were important for ensuring the conservation of the Cape Floristic Region

What was the outcome?

a ranking list of 34 research questions

How long did the research prioritization take?

No information provided.

Which methods were used to identify research priorities?

survey

How were the priorities for research identified exactly?

Step 1: online survey: participants were asked to provide up to 10 questions which, if answered, would, in their opinion, have a high probability of increasing the success of actions targeted at the conservation of biological diversity in the CFR, 361 questions submitted. Step 2: data processing: data cleaning, 34 summarizing questions compiled which were clustered into 7 research areas. Step 3: researchers assessed the final 34 questions against the IPBES framework

Which stakeholders took part?

Cape Floristic Region conservation community: decision-makers, public and private conservation practitioners, and researchers working at government policy, conservation or research agencies, non-governmental organizations, consultancies and universities. 53 participants: 17 researchers, 16 from government conservation entities, 10 from environmental non-governmental organizations, 7 consultants, 3 other.

How were stakeholders recruited?

Potential respondents were selected on the basis of key sectors in conservation and key people within these sectors or organizations (decision-makers, public and private conservation practitioners, and researchers working at government policy, conservation or research agencies, non-governmental organizations, consultancies and universities). Generally, these were people that the authors knew personally, had met at meetings, who held relevant positions in key organizations, or who had attended the annual Fynbos Forum (a conservation research, practice and policy conference) in the last five years.

Were stakeholders actively involved or did they just participate?

Stakeholders were mere participants of the research prioritization process; they were not actively involved in the process.